SKATES, RAYS and BONEY FISH


SKATES AND RAYS
 

In addition to the sharks, the Class Chondrichthyes also contains a number of skates and rays.  In these animals, the pectoral fins are greatly enlarged to form "wings" that undulate gracefully during swimming. Skates and rays differ from sharks in having few scales and being generally adapted for feeding on bottom-dwelling animals.  Although skates may have small teeth, those of rays are plate-like and adapted for crushing prey. 
 

Guitarfish
Rhinobatos casieri
Guitarfish
Pseudohypolophus mcnultyi
Whiptail stingray (female)
Dasyatis sp.
Micro

 

Micro Micro
Whiptail stingray (male)
 Dasyatis sp
Cow Nose Ray
Rhinoptera sp.
Eagle Ray
Myliobatis sp.
Micro Under Construction Under Construction

 

 

RATFISH
subclass Holocephali

The class Chondrichthyes or cartilaginous fishes are divided into two subclasses: Elasmobranchii (sharks, rays and skates) and Holocephali (ratfish).  Holocephali may be the oldest fishes alive today. Their closest living relatives are sharks, though in evolutionary terms they branched off some 400 million years ago and have remained isolated ever since.

 

  Ratfish
Ischyodus bifurcatus
 
 
  Common  

 

THE BONEY FISHES

The bony fishes belong to the Class Osteichthyes, unlike sharks, skates and rays,
members of this Class posse a true boney skeleton. Osteichthyes account for about 96% of all fish species.
Fossils of the bony fishes in Monmouth County, NJ tend to be scrappy, normally limited to isolated teeth, bones and scales making identification difficult.

 

Subclass Actinopterygii
Ray fined fish.


CRETACEOUS
 

Of the Cretaceous boney fish fossils Enchodus petrosus
is one of the largest and most abundant species found in New Jersey.

Saber Toothed Herring
Enchodus petrosus
Enchodus gladiolus
Enchodus ferox

 

 

Enchodus petrosus
Abundant
   
  Anomoeodus phaseolus   
  Common

 

 


TERTIARY
 

Mackerel
Scomberomorus sp.

 
Tuna
Thunnus sp.
Drum Fish
Pogonias sp.
Micro Uncommon Micro
     
 
Three-tooth Puffer
Triodon antiquus
Blackfish
Tautoga sp
.
 
  Micro  

 


Subclass Crossopterygii
Lobe-finned fish
 

. It was widely believed that this entire subclass of fishes was extinct. Then in 1938, a living coelacanth  was discovered off the coast of Southeast Africa.

 Diplurus newarki Coelacanth
 Late Triassic
 Lockatong Formation
  North Bergen, New Jersey
Coelacanth
 Diplurus newarki
Location Specific

 

Misc. Teleost Material

 

The Boney Fish
Misc. Fossils
Fish Coprolites
Common Common

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